Archive for April, 2011

We all just helped each other out and didn’t ask for help from anyone.

4222011

Good Friday Sermon
April 22, 2011
“a hot, swampy vernal day”
* Reuban’s favorite sermon

Gospel:
“A Threat”
By poet and machinist Fred Voss
From The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry

A Threat

My fellow workers and I
operate machines that cut steel blocks.

As the machines cut the steel,
my fellow workers like to stare and laugh at each other.
They are ready to piss on each other’s graves.

They fear me.
They call me crazy.
They don’t like the poetry I read.
They don’t like the paintings I have hung
on the board behind my machine.
They look at me
like they want to cut my balls off.

Tomorrow I think I will start bringing roses to work.
Each day I will stand a rose in a jar of water
on the workbench behind my machine.
I want to really terrify my fellow workers
this time.

Sermon:
Brothers and sisters, on this mortal coil, the Universe will often task us to beautify or adorn our paths along the way. Do not be bashful or terrified of this bidding for tyranny + hatred run deep in the youthful hearts of the wretchid. Though often we may feel crippled and powerless against it, our counterattack can be manifest in art and beauty. It’s said that the best lack all conviction and the worst are full of passion and intensity. Go forth art soldiers. Prove them wrong.

Good Friday Sermon
April 22, 2011
“a hot, swampy vernal day”
* Reuban’s favorite sermon

Gospel:
“A Threat”
By poet and machinist Fred Voss
From The Outlaw Bible of American Poetry

A Threat

My fellow workers and I
operate machines that cut steel blocks.

As the machines cut the steel,
my fellow workers like to stare and laugh at each other.
They are ready to piss on each other’s graves.

They fear me.
They call me crazy.
They don’t like the poetry I read.
They don’t like the paintings I have hung
on the board behind my machine.
They look at me
like they want to cut my balls off.

Tomorrow I think I will start bringing roses to work.
Each day I will stand a rose in a jar of water
on the workbench behind my machine.
I want to really terrify my fellow workers
this time.

Sermon:
Brothers and sisters, on this mortal coil, the Universe will often task us to beautify or adorn our paths along the way. Do not be bashful or terrified of this bidding for tyranny + hatred run deep in the youthful hearts of the wretchid. Though often we may feel crippled and powerless against it, our counterattack can be manifest in art and beauty. It’s said that the best lack all conviction and the worst are full of passion and intensity. Go forth art soldiers. Prove them wrong.

Mr. Larose,

I recently linked to an article on your publication’s Web site on my blog, thechicory.com. The article had the headline, “City faces decision in ongoing battle over Jackson Square artists.” The link to the post is here:

http://thechicory.com/blog/?p=1688

The post is about a perceived bias in the article. But that’s not what this e-mail is about. I commented on the article a week or so ago and noticed that the comment was never approved. I didn’t cuss or say anything prejudice in the comment and was wondering why it never showed up on the Web site. What constitutes comment moderation at City Business? Who moderates the comments? What was wrong with my comment?

I noticed the one comment that was approved was pro-prints and my comment was in response to that and was anti-print. I could understand if some mistake were made but I just couldn’t resist asking about this since the article and the many articles before about prints on the Square have been pro-print. If the comment wasn’t approved because of it’s content, then why have comments at all?

I am posting this e-mail on my blog. With your permission, I am posting your response as well.


‘For New Orleans people, arts and culture.’
Lance ‘Varg’ Vargas
thechicory.com
editor@thechicory.com

Cops: Woman had 81 pounds of illegal junk in her trunk

I got nothing to add.

City faces decision in ongoing battle over Jackson Square artists

No, it’s City Business and it’s all about the Benjamins baby. Just look at the blatantly bias line in this article about the issue of prints on Jackson Square…

That’s the time he expects it to take the city to come to its senses and rework a 2005 ordinance that banned artists from selling reproductions of their original work in the historic artist colony.

That’s not a quote in the article, it’s straight from the text written by the author. An editor let that through. So it should come as no surprise that the quotes that follow are essentially all from pro-print artists and their legal representation. The quotes opposed come from politicians but none from the 200 or so other artists on the Square who will be affected by lifting the ban.

The most pitiful thing is the statement that print sellers freedoms of speech and expression are being violated. That’s using the Constitution to do their dirty work. Those freedoms are just fine because their work can be displayed without using prints.

In the end it’s the audacity of the print artists that bothers me the most. Businesses have a model and they have conditions. To succeed they adjust their model to the conditions not the other way around. But at the peril of Jackson Square and the risk of it becoming another trite souvenir market, three artists who do just fine want to increase their margins anyway.

H/T American Zombie

Doing my part and reposting, 60 Minutes, Anderson Cooper, Who ever the hell else need to come down here and talk to Mr. Matherne and any others. There is nothing in the philosophies of Milton Friedman’s twisted disciples that accounts for Clayton Matherne.

Still perplexed by last night’s post crawfish berl discussion / disagreement about the Mississippi River.

It started out with talk of drownings in the river and the inability of folks to manage in the current even a few feet from the shore. That was all well and good and everyone concurred that the river is indeed dangerous. But just how dangerous it is was up for debate. Aggie and Randy stated rather unequivocally that a strong swimmer, in the right conditions, could stroke across the river from ferry landing to ferry landing no problem. Randy then stated that it has undoubtedly happened many times recently and through the ages. I responded that it has never happened and anyone who attempted it would drown and their body would be found in Plaquemines Parish.

In the course of this discussion, I stated that the river was a half a mile across at New Orleans. I remembered this fact from my training as a Hospitality Ranger several years ago. This was dismissed and laughed at. Aggie would only go so far as a quarter of a mile (at most) and Randy stated the river was 1/10 of a mile across (“and probably not even that”). Also, apparently they both overestimate the size of a football field because they thought that the river was at most three football fields across. I tried to say that a football field wasn’t shit lengthwise and many of the freighters on the River were longer than a football field. Our block is about the size of a football field.

I stuck by my ranger training and as a drunken debater I always prefer to spend my time finding an Internet connection and looking up the answer rather than fighting it out so, I went across the street and measured the river using an excercise site called Map My Run. It’s .47 of a mile from ferry landing to ferry landing, about nine football fields across. So that was settled so I thought. I got back ac

Harder to find was evidence of anyone successfully swimming across the river at Algiers Point or anywhere in GNO.

I found several colloquial stories…

Does anyone know if there’s any truth behind the myth that it’s impossible to swim across the Mississippi river with clothes on

It was a great feeling when I finished swimming across the Mississippi River, to fulfill my to-do-list-before-I-die. Even though it was at the Headwaters, MN, where the Mississippi River is only about 30 feet wide, but of course I did “Swim across the Mississippi River” (check).

Officials warn against swimming across river

But things got really interesting when I found several accounts of folks having done it as far south as Clarksdale…

Anyone for a Dip?
Since I was a kid, I’ve been warned that the mighty Mississippi is a deadly stew of swirling eddies—and that swimming across it is oneof the stupidest things a person can do. Naturally, I had to give it a try.

And they even had a YouTube clip too…

Those two stories damaged my argument a bit but Clarksdale is several hundred miles north of New Orleans and the current is stronger and the channel is deeper here. Not to mention the hazards presented by the millions of cubic feet of water whipping around Point. But I must say these videos did damage my argument.

Finally we jokingly convinced Randy that the only way he could prove the River could be crossed was if he did it himself. Right then and right there. So we rode our bikes down to the Old Point for some brews and went up to the levee to measure up the situation. Aaaaand that was about it. We just stared at the river and speculated some more. Never figured out if it was indeed possibly to swim across it at the Point or in New Orleans proper. I still say it can’t be done even if no freighters were coming. It’s a safe bet drownings would result if people tried it.